Tag Archives: alex maleev

Moon Knight #12 – That’s A Wrap, Khonshu

Written by: Brian Michael Bendis
Art by: Alex Maleev
Colors by: Matt Hollingsworth
Lettering by: VC’s Cory Petit
Cover by: Alex Maleev

Moon-Knight_12Moon Knight comes to its logical conclusion this issue. While there might not be many surprises or big oh-shit moment’s in this final send-off, it end’s on a solid note. Snap Dragon is in police custody and is dangled as bait for Count Nerfaria. The trap is set and the Count goes for it hook, line and sinker. Nefaria pulls a Terminator and blasts the L.A. police precint well into next week. Also he rather brilliantly let’s the cat out of the bag that he’s been bribing the police commissioner. He’s gig to fuck him up for not taking care of Snap Dragon before she ratted him out. Moon Knight misses his cue a bit and swoops down on the scene rather late. Nefaria has already disintegrated a few people by the time Moony comes to the rescue. That’s what I love about Marc Spector, even in his last issue he’s remains a flawed crazy fuck-up.The final showdown is a gritty powers vs. weapons kind of brawl. It’s pretty much what you’d expect from these two sluggers, however I felt it could have been taken up a notch. How epic would it have been on a LA set piece rather than a percent office. Just my two cents, but it’s the last battle, the last issue of the series, why not give it a pretty setting. Anyways, Moon Knight has a shrewd Ultron-sized trump card up his sleeve, so you all should check it out and see how it plays out. It’s a slick and effective way tame the ruckus and put Nefaria in his place.

The whole point of the this series seems to be to plant the seed for the Ultron War. The last page confirms this as Bendis let’s you know that Moon Knight will return in “The Age Of Ultron.” Not as cool of a name as Ultron War, I know, but still I foresee that being a bad-ass series. When people as me about this series, the way I always describe it is it’s like a deep cut on your favorite record. Growing up I listen to a lot of Black Sabbath, and the first record that I owned, or rather stole from my old man’s collection was Volume 4. That whole record is practically deep cuts. On one hand you have powerhouse dirges like Supernaut, Snowblind, Wheels of Confusion, on the other you have small intimate tunes and experimentations like FX, Laguna Sunrise and Changes. These demonstrate a soft, orchestral approach and a departure from their trademark style. I think that there is some distinct parallels between the two. Now, I’m not going to call Moon Knight the Volume 4 of the comic book world. That would be insane and heresy. But perhaps it is  the Volume 4 of Brian Michael Bendis’s and Maleev’s Marvel tenure. There’s a lot of story meat that has Bendis signature style of ridiculous super-powered combat, smart-ass dialogue, insults, and snappy come-backs. However there are some softer moments as well. The short-lived fling with Echo. The tired and disappointing failures of Marc Spector. The small reflective conversations with his assistant Buck Lime from S.H.I.E.L.D. Then there’s some completely out of the box experimental shit, like the Avenger’s personality war inside his head. The death of some of the personalities and the also the acquisition of new one’s in some sort soul absorbing way that alludes to the possibility that this actually part of Moon Knight’s power set.\Maleev’s contribution to Moon Knight was is similar to his work on Daredevil. He added that grimy and almost xeroxed inking style. L.A. was rendered like it had been dragged through the Labrea tar pits. It added gravity, mood, and raw texture to the simplest of scenes. The photo references which Maleev heavily relied on for work on Spider Woman are minimized here. There’s a more naturally art-class approach. That’s not to say that some reference wasn’t used, as it obviously was, but it’s more interpreted and stylized rather than a straight replication. Hollingsworth colors added a lot to this series and really tried to make it sing L.A. Noir. Dirty broken neon signs, blood-stained dusk, smog drenched colors, with pockets of hot saturation; Hollingsworth lights the stage Maleev set like hardboiled detective movie being screened in the back of porno shop. It’s skeevvy, slutty and very much L.A. And that’s a good thing.

I like this journey of Marc Spector working on his “Legends of the Khonshu” TV show only to have it cancelled after waging a long and costly war with the kingpin of L.A. It was a fitting end. I feel like I finally have a grasp of his character after this series. This fractured hero tries to figure what’s going on is his head and redeems himself in his eyes and those of his peers as well. Yeah, he’s a fuck-up, but in a lovable way. More importantly he’s not an emo loser. He doesn’t give up and never says dies, although he can be really tempted to at times. Spector fly by the seat of his pants and rolls with the punches as best he can. He goes over the edge sometime, but always seems to pop back over to sanity. I’m sure in a lot of way’s it how people with real mental illness act. Besides that it’s one of the more engaging stories that Bendis has told. You can really just lose yourself in the story because of how decompressed and natural the flow is. The realism just makes engrossing and entertaining. It’s a shame this didn’t see more ground-swell support, because Bendis did to Moon Knight, what Brubaker did to Iron Fist… he took a C-string character and gave him A-string development. Nicely done. I look forward to the “Age of Ultron.”

 

Story: 9
Art: 8
Jerry Nelson

Follow me on twitter and tell me what you think @the_hellhounds

Review: Winter Soldier #1 “Bucky Confronts his Past as the Winter Soldier”

Winter Soldier #1
Writer: Ed Brudbaker
Artist: Butch Guice and Bettie Breitweiser

James “Bucky” Barnes has lived one tragically long life. Recently, within the pages of Fear Itself, we believed Bucky (aka Captain America) to have found peace at the mercy of Sins Asgardian hammer. But thanks to Nick Fury and his stash of a version of the Infinity Formula, Bucky was revived by a heartbroken (Black) widows request. The Marvel universe now believes Bucky to be dead and only Nick Fury, Black Widow and Steve Rogers know the truth: Bucky Barnes has revived the legendary Russian agent, Winter Soldier! Bucky is back within his element, cast in the shadows. His plan? To tie up loose ends from his days as the puppeted Winter Solider agent during the Cold War. He won’t be alone, it seems that the Black Widow is a permament partner.

This issue kicks off with the Winter Soldier and the Black Widow entering a retired soviet base, presently disguised with a casino sitting atop it. Both Barnes and Romanov being natural spies, they quickly make way to a secret door leading to the underground base. The couple make a cute game of “First to be seen buys the mornings breakfast” as they incapcitate gaurds along the various complex corridors. They come along a familiar stasus pod, much like the pod the Winter Soldier was kept “preserved” inbetween missions. But this pod is clearly marked with the name: Zephyr. Could there still be undercover agents exectuing covert assassinations within the Marvel universe? If so, who controls them? And what does it all have to do with Dr. Doom!?

Winter Soldier creator, Ed Brubaker, launches the series as writer. Brubaker was a big pull for me, as he truly understands these characters and their personal voices. This is officially a continuation of his Winter Soldier mythology, first started within the pages of Captain America. And spy espionage dramas are both, Brubaker and Barnes expertee!

Penciler Butch Guice draws one fluid comic wide ation sequence. His detail on charcter expressions and faces has greatly improved from his last arc “Gulag” within the last Captain America volume. A handful of panels almost seem like he penciled over actual photographs, much like Alex Maleev’s art style. These panels crafted strong story beats that made the moment personable… if not a bit distracting. Guice’s panel placement need be commended, though he stuck to the basic rectangular box- it’s the way they were compressed and stacked that lead the eye and made the action and dialogue flow perfectly.

This is a solid beginning for a promising series. I forsee a long life with Brubaker leading the charge. This issue was everything you hoped and waited for, plus fun twists in choice of villian! And i’m not referring to the clocked tin man. Though I’m sad to see Bucky no longer wearing the flag, I’m glad he’s not dead: Long live the Winter Soldier!

Story: 9
Art: 9

Recommended this week:
Avengers X-Sanction #3 – Two unexpected guest crash Cables party!
Uncanny X-Force #21 – Fantomex undergoes mutliple Lobotomys. Reviewed here.
Swamp Thing #6 – The Rot inches ever closer to cutting off the Green.

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You will either love or hate these Avengers covers!

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Marvel Unveils AVENGERS ART APPRECIATION VARIANTS!

Ever imagine what the Avengers would look like if they existed throughout the ages? Well here’s your chance as Marvel is proud to unveil Avengers Art Appreciation Variants available throughout all of April! With everyone on the edge of their seats for Marvel Studio’s The Avengers, fans will have the opportunity to see their favorite super hero team in the styles of the world’s greatest artists like Rembrandt, Michelangelo, Monet, Pollock, Schielle and more! No fan can miss their favorite Marvel artists like Alex Maleev, Michael Kaluta, Gabriele Dell’otto, Greg Horn, Gerald Parel and more put their spin on these surefire classic covers. So be on the look-out True Believers, because in April – these Avengers Art Appreciation Variants are sure to go fast!

AGE OF APOCALPSE #2 Variant Cover by CHRISTIAN NAUCK
AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #683 Variant Cover by MIKE DEL MUNDO
AVENGERS #25 Variant Cover by GABRIELE DELL’OTTO
AVENGERS ASSEMBLE #2 Variant Cover by STEPHANIE HANS
DAREDEVIL #11 Variant Cover by STEFFI SCHUTZEE
FANTASTIC FOUR #605 Variant Cover by MICHAEL KALUTA
INCREDIBLE HULK #7 Variant Cover by CHARLES PAUL WILSON III
INVINCIBLE IRON MAN #515 Variant Cover by GREG HORN
SECRET AVENGERS #26 Variant Cover by JOE QUINONES
UNCANNY X-FORCE #24 Variant Cover by JULIAN TOTINO
UNCANNY X-MEN #11 Variant Cover by GREG HORN
WINTER SOLDIER #4 Variant Cover by JOHN TYLER CHRISTOPHER
WOLVERINE #304 Variant Cover by Gurihiru
WOLVERINE & THE X-MEN #9 Variant Cover by ALEX MALEEV
X-MEN #27 Variant Cover by KHOI PHAM

Moon Knight #9 Review – Moon Knight Goes on a Hellride.

Written by: Brian Michael Bendis
Art by: Alex Maleev
Colors by: Matt Hollingsworth
Lettering by: VC’s Cory Petit
Cover by: Alex Maleev

Moon-Knight_9Bendis’s reboot of Moon Knight is a off-beat superhero book that is hard to nail-down. You can draw some similarities to Image’s 2009 Cowboy  Ninja Viking (a comic by A.J. Lieberman and Riley Rossmo), but it doesn’t get much beyond surface detail. Marc Spector (aka Moon Knight) and Duncan both have 3 personalities. While Duncan had a cowboy, ninja, and viking running around his head; Spector has Captain America, Spider-Man, and Wolverine. The personalities in Moon Knight speak with color coded speech balloons (Capt. America is blue, Spider-Man is Red, Wolverine is Yellow), akin to how Cowboy Ninja Viking had their icons (a katana for the ninja, a gun for the cowboy, and an axe for the viking). However that’s where the likeness ends as each series varies in plot, tone, and complexity. Those comparisons aside, Moon Knight is unlike any comic I have read.

The plot is new-school noir with a dash of Sybil and a Hollywood twist. Marc Spector moves to LA to work on some TV show about his adventures as Moon Knight called “Legends of the Khonshu”. On one of his patrols as Moon Knight he intercepts the delivery of a Ultron robot body (a seed for the upcoming Ultron War?) and decides to try to find the kingpin of LA and shut him down. He’s losing his shit and seeing things. Visions of Captain America, Spider-Man and Wolverine show up to give him advice along the way. Spector teams up with Daredevil’s ex-girlfriend Echo, and ex-SHIELD agent Buck Lime as his R&D weapons guy (like Q from James Bond) as he fumbles around LA’s underworld. While the plot may seem like standard comic book fare, it’s really the nuanced decompressed approach that Bendis takes to the narrative that makes this a worthwhile read. He takes Moon Knight, a long-lost character that basically nobody cares about anymore, and gives him some real depth, personality and charm. Marc Spector is a flawed hero, arguably one of the most flawed ones in the Marvel Universe because of his history with schizophrenia, demon possession, multiple personalities and blood lust. Bendis makes small moments matter. He brings out the more humanistic qualities of Moon Knights faults. The kind of thing a reader can connect to. Spector is an eccentric outsider that’s self-conscious about being a d-listed super hero. He’s brash and makes hasty decisions leaving him prone to easy mistakes. He tries to be a cad, like Tony Stark, but just ends up kind of being a crappy flirt and having a lot more heart than you’d think. He’s kind of funny in a pathetic sort of way. In short, Marc Spector fails more than he succeeds, and is a lovable loser trying to redeem himself and pull out of a downward spiral. He’s that crazy underdog that you can’t help rooting for.

Last issue we learned that Count Nefaria (an old X-men and Avengers villain) turns out to be the LA kingpin and are left with a cliffhanger showdown. Issue 9 opens with a B-Story flashback to a scene with Buck Lime from a week ago. Marc basically tell’s him that he wants weapons like Captain America, Spider-Man, and Wolverine (a shield, web-shooters, and claws). The whole issue cross-cuts between the B-story of how his weapons get engineered and the present battle with Count Nefaria. He uses these weapons to narrowly escape powerful attacks and throw Nefaria off his game. Meanwhile, Marc Spector’s personalities start to bicker and fight as combat between Nefaria, Moon Knight, and Echo intensifies. Captain America think he should call in the Avengers and get out of there, Spider-Man is smart ass about the whole affair, and Wolverine just wants to kill Nefaria. The issues climaxes with a critical injury and Spector’s mind going haywire. Captain America, Spider-Man and Wolverine fight to the death inside his head and he begins to unravel. Just as things start to really get interesting it concludes with one mother of a cliffhanger. I was left a bit gobsmacked by it to tell you the truth, but am reluctant to spoil it. This is the strength of decompressed storytelling. By the building up small scenes and cross-cutting with action like an editor you can really drive the narrative to a dizzying climax and make it feel as if you just watched a crucial episode of a TV show. Like the episode right before a season finale. The only thing I think we are missing from Bendis is perhaps some big set-piece that really screams Los Angeles. How about a fight scene at Mann’s Chinese Theater where Moon Knight can’t tell between the dressed-up characters and his visions. Or Explosions on Hollywood & Vine; Spector having duel in the Viper Room; A chase scene through a full crowd at Venice Beach; An escape through the LA River. You get the idea. Moon Knight is in LA, let’s fuck it up.

Alex Maleev’s art on this is very textural, almost like something you would see coming out of a figure drawing class. There’s a rough, expressionistic and somewhat scratchy quality to his inked brush work, which contrast to some of the smooth fine lines that are penned in the background. He doesn’t shy away from logotypes or typesetting in signage, giving credibility to even the most mundane scene. Also I got to say that I like that Maleev got away from the heavy use of photo references like he was using on Spiderwoman. He relied on it so much that they gave credit to the model he used for Jessica Drew and it distracted format he content of the story. It’s still apparent that references are used, but they are much more loosely interpreted. Matt Hollingsworth, who also worked with Maleev on Spiderwoman, colors in a way that pops off the page and makes LA feel like the neon-soaked broken playground that it is. It’s the coloring that really sets the mood and atmosphere for the comic. This issue is more about the night and royal blue tones are used in the same way the movie Heat was color graded with cool tones for night. Hollingsworth helps the separation that Maleev creates between the layers of foreground and background, and knockouts the inked lines where appropriate with a color overlay. Special effects radiate subtly, and are not overly photoshopped. The panels are richer for it. The cover, which is all Maleev, is striking in its color and design. It’s a blue-man Spector with yellow eyes, tearing through his Moon Knight cloak on a textured painted background. It’s stark design that possibly alludes to Spector shedding some of the baggage of his personalities.

Bendis puts Moon Knight on overdrive and sends his ass over-the-edge. Whether he lands or even come out the other side is up in the air. Literally anything could happen. That’s what great about this series. It’s an unpredictable wild ride with a fractured super-hero that’s falling apart. This series was a slow-burn to start with and now it finally has the momentum and interest to be truly great. I’m hooked and somehow I care about Moon Knight now. Making Spector vulnerable and crazy worked. He’s a good guy and I hope he pull his shit together. I’m curious to see what happens next.

Story: 8.5
Art: 7.5

Jerry Nelson

Follow me on twitter and tell me what you think @the_hellhounds

 

Black Widow goes rogue: Secret Avengers #20 4-page preview


Tuesday morning Marvel Comics released a four-page preview of Secret Avengers #20 written by Warren Ellis with artwork by Alex Maleev.

How has the Warren Ellis run been? Are you enjoying the single issue format? Would you like to see more books like this?

THE SECRET AVENGERS ARE DEAD and only the Black Widow can save them in your first look at Secret Avengers #20! Fan favorite creators Warren Ellis & Alex Maleev send the Black Widow on her most secret mission yet…even her teammates don’t know she’s on it. Can the world’s greatest secret agent save the team alone? Find out as Ellis’ critically acclaimed run on Secret Avengers continues in Secret Avengers #20. Run the mission. Don’t get seen. Save the world! – Marvel Comics

Follow Matthew Sardo on Twitter! @comicvault

Tuesday’s top picks: Moon Knight #6 & X-Men: Schism #5

It’s the end of the X-Men world as we know it and I feel fine?

X-Men: Schism #5
Written by Jason Aaron
Art by Adam Kubert

It all comes down to this! After years of fighting side-by-side the X-Men are torn irrevocably in half. On one side, X-Men team leader, Cyclops. On the other, X-Men mainstay, Wolverine. Between them lies the fate of mutantkind, and surrounding them, the foes who want to end them forever! Be there for the conclusion of the story that will set the stage for the X-Men universe for years to come, from Marvel Architect writer Jason Aaron and art legend Adam Kubert!

Oh no! Cyclops might die (sarcasm). Even though we know that Cyclops won’t die and this is just a ploy to give Wolverine another book, I’m still excited. I have always been a fan of Cyclops and I feel he in general has taken a back seat to the bad boy Wolverine. If there is a slight chance that Cyclops might kick the shit out of Wolverine I’m all over this book. Dig deep, Wolverine tried to steal his girlfriend! I want a serious beat down.


Moon Knight (2011) #6
Written by Brian Michael Bendis
Art by Alex Maleev.

Moon Knight gets one step closer to the kingpin of Los Angeles and uses Ultron as bait. But in doing so he may have unleashed a hell the West Coast cannot survive. Another blistering chapter from the Eisner award-winning team that brought you DAREDEVIL and HALO!

Rated T+

Okay, so sometimes Bendis lets his characters talk too much, but Moon Knight is crazy! This is the perfect character for Bendis to write, with the four personalities bouncing around in Moon Knight’s head. I also feel like this is a perfect place for Echo, you kind of forgot about her and she just pops up in Los Angeles, makes sense. (Since Hawkeye came back from the dead, how many girls has he slept with? 3?) I know that Maleev’s art work goes both ways for some people but I’m a fan. By using a photo I believe he can grab an emotion in a person’s face like no one else. Plus, Maleev’s sketching style works to give up this crazy, any minute we could change direction feeling.

What do you think?
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