Tag Archives: snap dragon

Moon Knight #12 – That’s A Wrap, Khonshu

Written by: Brian Michael Bendis
Art by: Alex Maleev
Colors by: Matt Hollingsworth
Lettering by: VC’s Cory Petit
Cover by: Alex Maleev

Moon-Knight_12Moon Knight comes to its logical conclusion this issue. While there might not be many surprises or big oh-shit moment’s in this final send-off, it end’s on a solid note. Snap Dragon is in police custody and is dangled as bait for Count Nerfaria. The trap is set and the Count goes for it hook, line and sinker. Nefaria pulls a Terminator and blasts the L.A. police precint well into next week. Also he rather brilliantly let’s the cat out of the bag that he’s been bribing the police commissioner. He’s gig to fuck him up for not taking care of Snap Dragon before she ratted him out. Moon Knight misses his cue a bit and swoops down on the scene rather late. Nefaria has already disintegrated a few people by the time Moony comes to the rescue. That’s what I love about Marc Spector, even in his last issue he’s remains a flawed crazy fuck-up.The final showdown is a gritty powers vs. weapons kind of brawl. It’s pretty much what you’d expect from these two sluggers, however I felt it could have been taken up a notch. How epic would it have been on a LA set piece rather than a percent office. Just my two cents, but it’s the last battle, the last issue of the series, why not give it a pretty setting. Anyways, Moon Knight has a shrewd Ultron-sized trump card up his sleeve, so you all should check it out and see how it plays out. It’s a slick and effective way tame the ruckus and put Nefaria in his place.

The whole point of the this series seems to be to plant the seed for the Ultron War. The last page confirms this as Bendis let’s you know that Moon Knight will return in “The Age Of Ultron.” Not as cool of a name as Ultron War, I know, but still I foresee that being a bad-ass series. When people as me about this series, the way I always describe it is it’s like a deep cut on your favorite record. Growing up I listen to a lot of Black Sabbath, and the first record that I owned, or rather stole from my old man’s collection was Volume 4. That whole record is practically deep cuts. On one hand you have powerhouse dirges like Supernaut, Snowblind, Wheels of Confusion, on the other you have small intimate tunes and experimentations like FX, Laguna Sunrise and Changes. These demonstrate a soft, orchestral approach and a departure from their trademark style. I think that there is some distinct parallels between the two. Now, I’m not going to call Moon Knight the Volume 4 of the comic book world. That would be insane and heresy. But perhaps it is  the Volume 4 of Brian Michael Bendis’s and Maleev’s Marvel tenure. There’s a lot of story meat that has Bendis signature style of ridiculous super-powered combat, smart-ass dialogue, insults, and snappy come-backs. However there are some softer moments as well. The short-lived fling with Echo. The tired and disappointing failures of Marc Spector. The small reflective conversations with his assistant Buck Lime from S.H.I.E.L.D. Then there’s some completely out of the box experimental shit, like the Avenger’s personality war inside his head. The death of some of the personalities and the also the acquisition of new one’s in some sort soul absorbing way that alludes to the possibility that this actually part of Moon Knight’s power set.\Maleev’s contribution to Moon Knight was is similar to his work on Daredevil. He added that grimy and almost xeroxed inking style. L.A. was rendered like it had been dragged through the Labrea tar pits. It added gravity, mood, and raw texture to the simplest of scenes. The photo references which Maleev heavily relied on for work on Spider Woman are minimized here. There’s a more naturally art-class approach. That’s not to say that some reference wasn’t used, as it obviously was, but it’s more interpreted and stylized rather than a straight replication. Hollingsworth colors added a lot to this series and really tried to make it sing L.A. Noir. Dirty broken neon signs, blood-stained dusk, smog drenched colors, with pockets of hot saturation; Hollingsworth lights the stage Maleev set like hardboiled detective movie being screened in the back of porno shop. It’s skeevvy, slutty and very much L.A. And that’s a good thing.

I like this journey of Marc Spector working on his “Legends of the Khonshu” TV show only to have it cancelled after waging a long and costly war with the kingpin of L.A. It was a fitting end. I feel like I finally have a grasp of his character after this series. This fractured hero tries to figure what’s going on is his head and redeems himself in his eyes and those of his peers as well. Yeah, he’s a fuck-up, but in a lovable way. More importantly he’s not an emo loser. He doesn’t give up and never says dies, although he can be really tempted to at times. Spector fly by the seat of his pants and rolls with the punches as best he can. He goes over the edge sometime, but always seems to pop back over to sanity. I’m sure in a lot of way’s it how people with real mental illness act. Besides that it’s one of the more engaging stories that Bendis has told. You can really just lose yourself in the story because of how decompressed and natural the flow is. The realism just makes engrossing and entertaining. It’s a shame this didn’t see more ground-swell support, because Bendis did to Moon Knight, what Brubaker did to Iron Fist… he took a C-string character and gave him A-string development. Nicely done. I look forward to the “Age of Ultron.”

 

Story: 9
Art: 8
Jerry Nelson

Follow me on twitter and tell me what you think @the_hellhounds